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1984 released 30 years ago today!
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  1. #1
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    In The Studio - 1984

    30th anniversary of 1984. Interviews with Ed, Al & Mike re the making of 1984.

    It's a good listen.

    http://www.inthestudio.net/redbeards...chael-anthony/

  2. #2
    Only a little tardy
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    Cool. I'll have to get that a listen to.
    http://imgur.com/Yij2gqN

  3. #3
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    1984 released 30 years ago today!

    Can't believe it's been 30 years. Â*A different sound than the previous albums but still great nonetheless.
    Last edited by VH Freak; January 9th, 2014 at 02:46 PM.

  4. #4
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    Great interviews from the 3 and some interesting commentary from Mike too.
    http://imgur.com/Yij2gqN

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by VH Freak View Post
    Can't believe it's been 30 years. Â*A different sound than the previous albums but still great nonetheless.
    Totally... 30 years???!!!??? WTF.
    But I can remember running out of school at 2:30 that day -- the longest school day ever, so excited to get home and listen to the new record. I can vaguely remember putting on the needle and hearing the opening sounds of 1984 (intro). Thinking whoa this is different but liking it. Must've played it 100 times that first day.. ha
    Last edited by thismusicsux; January 9th, 2014 at 11:19 PM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by thismusicsux View Post
    Totally... 30 years???!!!??? WTF.
    But I can remember running out of school at 2:30 that day -- the longest school day ever, so excited to get home and listen to the new record. I can vaguely remember putting on the needle and hearing the sounds opening sounds of 1984 (intro). Thinking whoa this is different but liking it. Must've played it 100 times that first day.. ha
    1984 was the first VH album i did NOT buy, the day of release.

    I remember buying Diverdown & Fair Warning, the day of release.
    But by 1984 i was very much interested in bands like Metallica & Mercyful Fate & Raven.

    I had heard "Jump" on the radio & MTV, and thought it was awful (save for the great solo).
    Then, weeks later, a new track started getting airplay (Panama).
    I vividly recall that breakdown, that middle part, really making the fur rise, so to speak.
    I vividly remember thinking, "Fuck, Eddie...you still know how to push my musical buttons."

    Then they started playing HFT, and i was like, "Jesus Christ! These guys still have got it!
    What was Jump all about?!"

    So i did end up buying the cassette tape, and really liking a lot of it.
    I thought "Panama" was incredible, though this was long before i heard it ten million times!

  7. #7
    Love ya moms......
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    http://ultimateclassicrock.com/van-halen-1984/

    30 Years Ago: Van Halen Release ‘1984′

    When Van Halen’s sixth album, ‘1984,’ arrived in stores on Jan. 9, 1984, it felt like a much-needed respite in a year that had already started under the heavy vibes of George Orwell’s dystopian novel of the same name.

    But life was apparently California-sunny for the four members of Van Halen: a place where electrifying party metal flowed like beer out of a keg, the concert stage was always filled with athletic splits and scissor kicks and band camaraderie burst in grinning technicolor from every magazine photo and promo video like irrefutable evidence. Or was it?

    As the whole wide world would learn before 1984 — the year — was even in the books, deep rifts had, in fact, been gradually destabilizing Van Halen’s foundations for quite some time. While the loudest whispers revolved around growing disagreements over recording practices and creative direction (most centering on longtime producer Ted Templeman), the bigger-picture problem was a widening personal and professional gulf between guitarist Eddie Van Halen and singer David Lee Roth.

    For years, the relatively passive and media-shy Eddie had been happy to focus on the music while the irrepressible Diamond Dave did everything he could to steal headlines from his wunderkind guitarist. But as Roth’s ego gained reckless momentum throughout the early ’80s, Eddie Van Halen had quietly shored up his interests, both publicly (by working with outside parties like Michael Jackson and Queen guitarist Brian May) and privately (by building a home studio) — setting the stage for a looming rock ‘n’ roll battle for the band’s very soul.

    But not before the fractious duo, along with bassist Michael Anthony and drummer Alex Van Halen, had managed to create another commercial triumph with ‘1984,’ large chunks of which were recorded at Eddie’s new 5150 Studio and, more importantly, on the guitarist’s terms, not Roth’s, Templeman’s or anyone else’s. No one could argue with the results, as ‘1984’ would go on to enjoy multi-platinum sales figures not seen since Van Halen’s watershed debut six years earlier, while delivering the band’s first No. 1 hit: the surprisingly keyboard-driven ‘Jump.’

    ‘1984’ was so deep with great songs that not even a second synth-slathered single, ‘I’ll Wait,’ could turn off Van Halen’s guitar-obsessed fans, who were broadly catered to by an embarrassment of hard-rock riches, ranging from the anthem-sized ‘Panama’ and the MTV smash ‘Hot for Teacher’ to solid album cuts like the seductive ‘Drop Dead Legs’ and full-tilt frantic ‘Top Jimmy.’

    Fans were primed and ready by the time Van Halen hit the road on Jan. 18 for what would prove to be a grueling, six-month marathon across North America, followed by another few months of dates around the globe. But was the band ready? Seemingly no, as long-festering tensions kept right on festering behind the scenes, even as the media blitz surrounding both the tour and album tried to focus on the good times.

    But whenever he wasn’t singing that year, Roth seemed to be mouthing off in the press, taking potshots at everything from Duran Duran to foreign policy, while his bandmates grew increasingly alienated and uncomfortable with his antics, particularly Eddie, who had discovered some measure of stability with actress and wife Valerie Bertinelli.

    As Eddie Van Halen later told Rolling Stone, “I’d stay up until 6 in the hotel room writing, [and] Roth would bang on everybody’s door at 8, 9 in the morning to get us to go roller skating or jogging. I’m going, ‘F— you, man, I just got to sleep,’ and he would be saying, ‘Well, man, you live wrong.’” For his part, Roth simply shrugged it off by admitting that “there was always tension between me and Edward … but then there’s always tension with me and everyone!”

    Just as Van Halen’s year-long, globetrotting tour was wrapping up in September 1984, ‘Jump’ won top honors at the MTV Video Music Award (the network’s Lost Weekend With Van Halen contest had drawn more than a million entries earlier in the year).

    And then Roth started talking about recording a solo album. Within months, he’d released an EP of vintage cover tunes, ‘Crazy From the Heat,’ and, despite initially toeing the company line in most interviews, he became increasingly unavailable to his bandmates, who were already working on new material, and considering a live album and other possible next steps. Before long, the dissenting opinions and war of words snowballed, setting in motion the rest of the band’s break with Roth the following year.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by unchainedguitars View Post
    1984 was the first VH album i did NOT buy, the day of release.

    So i did end up buying the cassette tape, and really liking a lot of it.
    I thought "Panama" was incredible, though this was long before i heard it ten million times!
    nice. DD was the first album I waited for and bought new...so I missed some good times of the first 4 albums being "new"

    Panama yes. After hearing 10 million times now I can be quick to skip that song too often...but when I do give it a listen (listened today)... it is one *incredible* song.

    I remember 'I'll Wait' being 2nd single...but think it was quick and Panama came soon after w video. I'll Wait was kinda risky move as 2nd single right after Jump w the other keyboard song. kinda crazy.
    Last edited by thismusicsux; January 9th, 2014 at 11:52 PM.

  9. #9
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    and here's another from today Billboard...

    http://www.billboard.com/articles/re...y-track-review

    ====
    Who could have imagined that a synthesizer, and not a guitar, would put Van Halen over the top? But that was indeed the case when the first blast of Oberheim OB-Xa announced the arrival of "Jump" and the quartet's leap into the rock superstar strata with the album "1984," the latter of which was released 30 years ago today on January 9, 1984. After five platinum previous albums Van Halen was already there, of course, and following a headlining performance (for a whopping $1.5 million) at the 1983 US Festival, it was clear that even bigger things lay ahead for the band. But how big, and how different, was the surprise.

    Stylistically, Van Halen staked its reputation on the combination of frontman David Lee Roth's clown prince personality and, primarily, Eddie Van Halen's six-string heroics, so the prominence of synthesizer on "1984" -- on the short title track instrumental, "Jump" and "I'll Wait" -- marked an unexpected new direction that caught many of VH's guitar-loving fans off guard and uncertain, although ultimately assuaged by many of the set's other six songs.

    Most of the world could've cared less, though; "Jump," with its cheerfully lo-fi (and low-dough) video, became VH's first and only No. 1 Hot 100 hit. "I'll Wait" went Top 15 as well, and the Ted Templeman-produced "1984" reached No. 2 on the Billboard 200 and was certified Diamond by the RIAA. But while it marked the beginning of a hugely successful era -- the next four VH albums would debut at No. 1 -- it marked the end of Roth's first tenure with the band; he quit in 1985 over increasing creative differences, replaced by Sammy Hagar. Roth would return, however, briefly in 1996 and with staying power since 2006, and anyone who's seen VH on the road since then knows well the staying power of those songs from "1984."

    "1984"/"Jump"
    The 67-second title track instrumental gently introduces the synthesizer riff that shocked the world in "Jump" -- an idea Eddie Van Halen had as far back as 1981 but didn't pursue until he built his 5150 home studio. He may have locked horns with Roth and Templeman over the idea, but the resulting tune was just over four minutes of pure pop fun, with a hook (inspired by the synth track on Hall & Oates' "Kiss on My List") that was tailor-made to become a sports arena anthem -- especially for jump balls at basketball games. And lest we get carried away with the synth angle, don't forget there's a guitar break as well as a subtle and slinky guitar line throughout that gives the tune a bit of spine.

    "Panama"
    How to best come back after the synthesizer shock of "Jump?" How about the molten guitar attack of "Panama," a muscular rocker that stacks up well alongside previous VH classics such as "Ain't Talkin' Bout Love" and "The Cradle Will Rock." Roth has said the song's about a stripper and a car -- the latter because the flamboyant frontman, after being accused by an interviewer of writing only about sex, drugs and fast cars, realized he'd never actually written a song about a car yet. Released after "Jump" and "I'll Wait," it hit No. 13 on the Hot 100 to become VH's third Top 20 single from "1984."

    "Top Jimmy"
    Though it pales after "1984's" striking opening attack, this tribute to James Paul Koncek of the Los Angeles roots-punk band Top Jimmy & the Rhythm Pigs lets Eddie strut his stuff from the airy opening patterns to the blues groove of the main song. And how many times do you hear Roth conceding that somebody else may be "The King?"

    "Drop Dead Legs"
    Driven by Alex's stomp and Eddie's gritty hard rock chordings and colored by the group's effortless harmonies, it also features one of "1984's" more inventive and off-the-cuff guitar solos. There's a lot of songs like this in group's catalog, but this one sits particularly well with those who like their Halen heavy and hefty.

    "Hot For Teacher"
    The final single from "1984" is an urgent shuffle that builds to explosive choruses with a booming start created by four bass drums played at once. The latter part of the song, meanwhile, incorporated a portion of a late 70s outtake called "Voodoo Queen." Roth co-directed the video, which featured Norwegian model Lillian Muller as the sexy chemistry teacher and was targeted by the Parents Music Resource Center for its suggestive lyrics and explicit exhibitionism -- which only attracted more eyeballs to it.

    "I'll Wait"
    The pulsing second single from "1984" -- co-written with Doobie Brothers/Steely Dan veteran Michael McDonald -- also featured prominent keyboards, including a synthesized bass line by Michael Anthony, as well as Alex Van Halen's Rototom drums. It was one of the more hotly contested tracks on the album, with Roth and Templeman voting no and Eddie and engineer Donn Landee pushing, and ultimately prevailing, for its inclusion. Roth's lyrical inspiration came from a female model appearing in a print ad for Calvin Klein's men's underwear, which he reportedly taped to his television set while he wrote the lyrics.

    "Girl Gone Bad"
    This is the moment of "1984" where it sounds like Rush snuck into 5150 and slipped a track into the mix, at least until Roth starts singing about the titular subject. Eddie's having fun with his harmonics here, and the song's prog edge provides yet another welcome change of pace.

    "House of Pain"
    The Van Halen brothers kick into a heavy, metallic groove for "1984's" closing track, a song that dates back to the mid-70s and was also recorded during demo sessions for Kiss' Gene Simmons. It's certainly more album track than anthem, but rest assured there's plenty of pleasure in this "Pain."

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by thismusicsux View Post
    nice. DD was the first album I waited for and bought new...so I missed some good times of the first 4 albums being "new"

    Panama yes. After hearing 10 million times now I can be quick to skip that song too often...but when I do give it a listen (listened today)... it is one *incredible* song.

    I remember 'I'll Wait' being 2nd single...but think it was quick and Panama came soon after w video. I'll Wait was kinda risky move as 2nd single right after Jump w the other keyboard song. kinda crazy.
    I really loved "I'll Wait."

    I thought that tune had a much more majestic sound than "Jump."
    The keyboard riff is great, you could almost picture it played on a guitar.
    The solo is fantastic, the drums sound so beautiful & splashy, the vocal is great.
    I think this was the only keyboard ballad i really liked.
    I thought "Love walks in" was over the top, syrupy.
    I thought "Right now" was pretentious.

    "I'll wait" had a vulnerability, thanks to Dave's great lyrics.
    It just felt moodier and a bit more connected to rock, just the pulse of it.

 

 

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