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tn_1984

1984 released 30 years ago today!

Can’t believe it’s been 30 years.  A different sound than the previous albums but still great nonetheless.  What do you think?  Where does this rate with the other 5 classic albums?

Comments
  1. Nick AVH fan

    12 months ago

    Great interviews from the 3 and some interesting commentary from Mike too.

  2. thismusicsux

    12 months ago

    QUOTE

    Can't believe it's been 30 years. 
  3. unchainedguitars

    12 months ago

    QUOTE

    Totally... 30 years???!!!??? WTF.
    But I can remember running out of school at 2:30 that day -- the longest school day ever, so excited to get home and listen to the new record.  I can vaguely remember putting on the needle and hearing the sounds opening sounds of 1984 (intro).  Thinking whoa this is different but liking it.  Must've played it 100 times that first day.. ha

    1984 was the first VH album i did NOT buy, the day of release.

    I remember buying Diverdown & Fair Warning, the day of release.
    But by 1984 i was very much interested in bands like Metallica & Mercyful Fate & Raven.

    I had heard “Jump” on the radio & MTV, and thought it was awful (save for the great solo).
    Then, weeks later, a new track started getting airplay (Panama).
    I vividly recall that breakdown, that middle part, really making the fur rise, so to speak.
    I vividly remember thinking, “Fuck, Eddie…you still know how to push my musical buttons.”

    Then they started playing HFT, and i was like, “Jesus Christ! These guys still have got it!
    What was Jump all about?!”

    So i did end up buying the cassette tape, and really liking a lot of it.
    I thought “Panama” was incredible, though this was long before i heard it ten million times!

  4. Achilleslastand

    12 months ago

    http://ultimateclassicrock.com/van-halen-1984/

    30 Years Ago: Van Halen Release

  5. thismusicsux

    12 months ago

    QUOTE

    1984 was the first VH album i did NOT buy, the day of release.
    
    So i did end up buying the cassette tape, and really liking a lot of it.
    I thought "Panama" was incredible, though this was long before i heard it ten million times!

    nice. DD was the first album I waited for and bought new…so I missed some of the early albums being “new”

    Panama yes. After hearing 10 million times now I can be quick to skip that song too often…but when I do give it a listen (listened today)… it is one *incredible* song.

  6. thismusicsux

    12 months ago

    url]http://www.billboard.com/articles/review/5869374/van-halen-s-1984-at-30-classic-track-by-track-review[/url]

    ====
    Who could have imagined that a synthesiz
    and here’s another from today Billboard…

    http://www.billboard.com/articles/review/5869374/van-halen-s-1984-at-30-classic-track-by-track-review
    
    ====
    Who could have imagined that a synthesizer, and not a guitar, would put Van Halen over the top? But that was indeed the case when the first blast of Oberheim OB-Xa announced the arrival of "Jump" and the quartet's leap into the rock superstar strata with the album "1984," the latter of which was released 30 years ago today on January 9, 1984. After five platinum previous albums Van Halen was already there, of course, and following a headlining performance (for a whopping $1.5 million) at the 1983 US Festival, it was clear that even bigger things lay ahead for the band. But how big, and how different, was the surprise.
    
    Stylistically, Van Halen staked its reputation on the combination of frontman David Lee Roth's clown prince personality and, primarily, Eddie Van Halen's six-string heroics, so the prominence of synthesizer on "1984" -- on the short title track instrumental, "Jump" and "I'll Wait" -- marked an unexpected new direction that caught many of VH's guitar-loving fans off guard and uncertain, although ultimately assuaged by many of the set's other six songs.
    
    Most of the world could've cared less, though; "Jump," with its cheerfully lo-fi (and low-dough) video, became VH's first and only No. 1 Hot 100 hit. "I'll Wait" went Top 15 as well, and the Ted Templeman-produced "1984" reached No. 2 on the Billboard 200 and was certified Diamond by the RIAA. But while it marked the beginning of a hugely successful era -- the next four VH albums would debut at No. 1 -- it marked the end of Roth's first tenure with the band; he quit in 1985 over increasing creative differences, replaced by Sammy Hagar. Roth would return, however, briefly in 1996 and with staying power since 2006, and anyone who's seen VH on the road since then knows well the staying power of those songs from "1984."
    
    
    "1984"/"Jump"
    The 67-second title track instrumental gently introduces the synthesizer riff that shocked the world in "Jump" -- an idea Eddie Van Halen had as far back as 1981 but didn't pursue until he built his 5150 home studio. He may have locked horns with Roth and Templeman over the idea, but the resulting tune was just over four minutes of pure pop fun, with a hook (inspired by the synth track on Hall & Oates' "Kiss on My List") that was tailor-made to become a sports arena anthem -- especially for jump balls at basketball games. And lest we get carried away with the synth angle, don't forget there's a guitar break as well as a subtle and slinky guitar line throughout that gives the tune a bit of spine.
    
    
    "Panama"
    How to best come back after the synthesizer shock of "Jump?" How about the molten guitar attack of "Panama," a muscular rocker that stacks up well alongside previous VH classics such as "Ain't Talkin' Bout Love" and "The Cradle Will Rock." Roth has said the song's about a stripper and a car -- the latter because the flamboyant frontman, after being accused by an interviewer of writing only about sex, drugs and fast cars, realized he'd never actually written a song about a car yet. Released after "Jump" and "I'll Wait," it hit No. 13 on the Hot 100 to become VH's third Top 20 single from "1984."
    
    
    "Top Jimmy"
    Though it pales after "1984's" striking opening attack, this tribute to James Paul Koncek of the Los Angeles roots-punk band Top Jimmy & the Rhythm Pigs lets Eddie strut his stuff from the airy opening patterns to the blues groove of the main song. And how many times do you hear Roth conceding that somebody else may be "The King?"
    
    
    "Drop Dead Legs"
    Driven by Alex's stomp and Eddie's gritty hard rock chordings and colored by the group's effortless harmonies, it also features one of "1984's" more inventive and off-the-cuff guitar solos. There's a lot of songs like this in group's catalog, but this one sits particularly well with those who like their Halen heavy and hefty.
    
    
    "Hot For Teacher"
    The final single from "1984" is an urgent shuffle that builds to explosive choruses with a booming start created by four bass drums played at once. The latter part of the song, meanwhile, incorporated a portion of a late 70s outtake called "Voodoo Queen." Roth co-directed the video, which featured Norwegian model Lillian Muller as the sexy chemistry teacher and was targeted by the Parents Music Resource Center for its suggestive lyrics and explicit exhibitionism -- which only attracted more eyeballs to it.
    
    
    "I'll Wait"
    The pulsing second single from "1984" -- co-written with Doobie Brothers/Steely Dan veteran Michael McDonald -- also featured prominent keyboards, including a synthesized bass line by Michael Anthony, as well as Alex Van Halen's Rototom drums. It was one of the more hotly contested tracks on the album, with Roth and Templeman voting no and Eddie and engineer Donn Landee pushing, and ultimately prevailing, for its inclusion. Roth's lyrical inspiration came from a female model appearing in a print ad for Calvin Klein's men's underwear, which he reportedly taped to his television set while he wrote the lyrics.
    
    
    "Girl Gone Bad"
    This is the moment of "1984" where it sounds like Rush snuck into 5150 and slipped a track into the mix, at least until Roth starts singing about the titular subject. Eddie's having fun with his harmonics here, and the song's prog edge provides yet another welcome change of pace.
    
    
    "House of Pain"
    The Van Halen brothers kick into a heavy, metallic groove for "1984's" closing track, a song that dates back to the mid-70s and was also recorded during demo sessions for Kiss' Gene Simmons. It's certainly more album track than anthem, but rest assured there's plenty of pleasure in this "Pain."
  7. unchainedguitars

    12 months ago

    QUOTE

    nice.  DD was the first album I waited for and bought new...so I missed some good times of the first 4 albums being "new"
    
    Panama yes.  After hearing 10 million times now I can be quick to skip that song too often...but when I do give it a listen (listened today)... it is one *incredible* song.
    
    I remember 'I'll Wait' being 2nd single...but think it was quick and Panama came soon after w video.  I'll Wait was kinda risky move as 2nd single right after Jump w the other keyboard song.  kinda crazy.

    I really loved “I’ll Wait.”

    I thought that tune had a much more majestic sound than “Jump.”
    The keyboard riff is great, you could almost picture it played on a guitar.
    The solo is fantastic, the drums sound so beautiful & splashy, the vocal is great.
    I think this was the only keyboard ballad i really liked.
    I thought “Love walks in” was over the top, syrupy.
    I thought “Right now” was pretentious.

    “I’ll wait” had a vulnerability, thanks to Dave’s great lyrics.
    It just felt moodier and a bit more connected to rock, just the pulse of it.

  8. 1234over

    12 months ago

    Like things about this record, but it sits so awkwardly next to the others that I have a hard time digesting it. If Roth had done even one more record with them at 5150, it might not remind me so much of Van Hagar…but it does.

    I like all the songs! There are tons of cool things happening. I remember being stoned, listening for the first time with a couple friends, and exclaiming “They have a new sound!”…it was kind of exciting in that way.

    Like “Jump” just fine.

    “Panama”…meh, I dig it now and then, but right from the start didn’t like the chorus. The guitar sound is too soft somehow. It really epitomizes EVH’s new sound, and “chugging with accents” style, the one that so many of the lamer bands copped. Errrgh.

    Dig “I’ll Wait”..very cool 80’s vibe.

    “Top Jimmy”…it’s alright.

    One problem I have with the record is that lots of the instrumental sections kind of sound alike. In my head, I will be replaying some of the parts, and not realize which tune it is (Drop Dead? House of Pain? Girl Gone Bad?) they all have that cymbal wash, and kind of “fusion-y” soloing. It’s cool, but loses some distinctiveness after awhile.

    I don’t wanna talk about the Simmons drums.

    Ted Templeman was the 5th member (that Mike interview made it plain).

  9. thismusicsux

    12 months ago

    QUOTE

    One problem I have with the record is that lots of the instrumental sections kind of sound alike. In my head, I will be replaying some of the parts, and not realize which tune it is (Drop Dead? House of Pain? Girl Gone Bad?) they all have that cymbal wash, and kind of "fusion-y" soloing. It's cool, but loses some distinctiveness after awhile.
    

    those 3 do have similar instrumental / fusion-y / solo sections going on when I think of it… but those are 3 of my fave songs and don’t have a problem w em. but I can see your point. They are just so bad-ass though. From the killer drums to Ed’s killer solos.

  10. 1234over

    12 months ago

    QUOTE

    those 3 do have similar instrumental / fusion-y / solo sections going on when I think of it... but those are 3 of my fave songs and don't have a problem w em.  but I can see your point.  They are just so bad-ass though.  From the killer drums to Ed's killer solos.

    I dig those tunes as well, Ed & Al are tearing it up. I think it’s the kind of thing that Ted Templeman would have had them work on, when he had more control. He probably just worked on the vocals with DLR on that record.

  11. unchainedguitars

    12 months ago

    QUOTE

    I dig those tunes as well, Ed & Al are tearing it up. I think they can pull those kinds of jams out all day long, though. It kind of drags the record for me when I listen all the way through (plus the sound gets a bit out of focus, and washed out sometimes).
    
    
    I think it's the kind of thing that Ted Templeman would have had them change, when he had more control.  He probably just worked on the vocals with DLR on that record.

    I think “Girl Gone Bad” has one of Ed’s most exciting guitar solo’s.
    It really does possess “that falling down the stairs & landing on your feet” kinda vibe.
    I also love how he hits that cool octave thing to get out of it, then goes straight into
    those spooky chords, with the volume turned down a little.

    The entire music to that piece is just astounding, maybe his last great composition.
    It sounds like one take, like he’s just playing through it, from opening to solo to breakdown to the
    finale.

    I also love the solo in “Jimmy.”
    He just goes into these almost atonal/fusion phrases, yet they make sense somehow.

  12. unchainedguitars

    12 months ago

    I swear those fusiony 1984 solo’s sound like sax or clarinet phrases.
    I can actually hear “Top Jimmy” played on a saxophone (the solo), in my head.

    It’s strange how Ed went straight back to basics on 5150, because GGB and Jimmy & Legs,
    he was really stretching out and playing freely.

  13. Nick AVH fan

    12 months ago

    QUOTE

    Like things about this record, but it sits so awkwardly next to the others that I have a hard time digesting it. If Roth had done even one more record with them at 5150, it might not remind me so much of  Van Hagar...but it does.
    
    I like all the songs! There are tons of cool things happening. I remember being stoned, listening for the first time with a couple friends, and exclaiming "They have a new sound!"...it was kind of exciting in that way.
    
    Like "Jump" just fine.
    
    "Panama"...meh, I dig it now and then, but right from the start didn't like the chorus. The guitar sound is too soft somehow. It really epitomizes EVH's new sound, and "chugging with accents" style, the one that so many of the lamer bands copped. Errrgh.
    
    Dig "I'll Wait"..very cool 80's vibe.
    
    "Top Jimmy"...it's alright.
    
    One problem I have with the record is that lots of the instrumental sections kind of sound alike. In my head, I will be replaying some of the parts, and not realize which tune it is (Drop Dead? House of Pain? Girl Gone Bad?) they all have that cymbal wash, and kind of "fusion-y" soloing. It's cool, but loses some distinctiveness after awhile.
    
    I don't wanna talk about the Simmons drums.
    
    Ted Templeman was the 5th member (that Mike interview made it plain).

    It was because Ed wanted more control or at least take reign of a few things. I think the interview even stated that he didn’t really want 5150 to turn into a full studio but a place to hash out ideas.

    Also, Alex’s drum sound changed due 5150 not having a drum room. He could only fit simmons’ pads and rototoms in there at the time. I think I read that 5150 didn’t have the extra room until 1987 or so.

  14. 1234over

    12 months ago

    QUOTE

    
    

    It was because Ed wanted more control or at least take reign of a few things. I think the interview even stated that he didn’t really want 5150 to turn into a full studio but a place to hash out ideas.

    Also, Alex’s drum sound changed due 5150 not having a drum room. He could only fit simmons’ pads and rototoms in there at the time. I think I read that 5150 didn’t have the extra room until 1987 or so.

    I’m not sure what in my post you are referring to?

    I have read that about the Simmons drums (I’m a bit skeptical), but whatever the reason was for them using those drums, they don’t sound good, and I think it should have been obvious to them (I think they sound good with the synth tunes).

  15. Nick AVH fan

    12 months ago

    QUOTE

    I'm not sure what in my post you are referring to?
    
    I have read that about the Simmons drums (I'm a bit skeptical), but whatever the reason was for them using those drums, they don't sound good, and I think it should have been obvious to them (I think they sound good with the synth tunes).
    
    Wierd, I had snipped your post so that I'd answer specifically.
    
    Here's a pic of 5150 in the early days with the simmon pads in the background
    
    
    43772
  16. 1234over

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    Wierd, I had snipped your post so that I'd answer specifically.
    
    Here's a pic of 5150 in the early days with the simmon pads in the background
    
    
    43772

    I still don’t know what you mean.

    I think AVH liked the sound of the Simmons drums, and though it may have been a matter of convenience, he should have known better. They were a major act, working on a legendary career…no need to go half-assed (if you don’t want to). Maybe you like the Simmons drums, that’s fine. My own opinion is that acoustics drums would have sounded a lot better.

    I know EVH wanted more control, but I don’t think it lead to better music.

  17. Nick AVH fan

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    I still don't know what you mean. 
    
    I think AVH liked the sound of the Simmons drums, and though it may have been a matter of convenience, he should have known better. They were a major act, working on a legendary career...no need to go half-assed (if you don't want to). Maybe you like the Simmons drums, that's fine. My own opinion is that acoustics drums would have sounded a lot better.
    
    Edit: Looking at the pic, I don't see why they couldn't have fit a drum set in there...
    
    
    I know EVH wanted more control, but I don't think it led to better music.

    I actually don’t really care about the Simmons drums, his acoustic sound is way better. What I meant was that it seemed Al didn’t have much of choice if they were going to record at 5150. I’ve read several interviews where Al said they couldn’t do a proper acoustic kit in there because of other sounds bleeding into the mics. I guess they couldn’t get baffles in between to work well. I remember reading that he liked to play them, and had used them on his kit since 1981/2 on tour, but I think he would rather have had used an acoustic kit on record.

    He uses them again in 5150, and it sounds worse than on 1984 honestly. Like really cheesy electronic drum sounds. I think if they had stuck with recording at Sunset/Ted it would have changed a lot of things on 1984 soundwise.

  18. 1234over

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    I actually don't really care about the Simmons drums, his acoustic sound is way better. What I meant was that it seemed Al didn't have much of choice if they were going to record at 5150. I've read several interviews where Al said they couldn't do a proper acoustic kit in there because of other sounds bleeding into the mics. I guess they couldn't get baffles in between to work well. I remember reading that he liked to play them, and had used them on his kit since 1981/2 on tour, but I think he would rather have had used an acoustic kit on record.
    
    He uses them again in 5150, and it sounds worse than on 1984 honestly. Like really cheesy electronic drum sounds. I think if they had stuck with recording at Sunset/Ted it would have changed a lot of things on 1984 soundwise.

    I see now what you were getting at.

    I have read all that, but it still seems odd to me. AVH often kinda comes across as a “purist” and had all those complaints about Donn Landee having him take the front heads off his kicks…then here he is using Simmons drums. I don’t get it.

    I think it would have been cool if he only used them on the synth driven tunes, because that synthetic sound sits better with synths. It’s cool that they took some chances, but those were obviously faddish sounds that would sound dated pretty quick.

  19. Nick AVH fan

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    I see now what you were getting at. 
    
    I have read all that, but it still seems odd to me. AVH often kinda comes across as a "purist" and had all those complaints about Donn Landee having him take the front heads off his kicks...then here he is using Simmons drums. I don't get it. 
    
    I think it would have been cool if he only used them on the synth driven tunes, because that synthetic sound sits better with synths. It's cool that they took some chances, but those were obviously faddish sounds that would sound dated pretty quick.

    Sometimes it seems like he didn’t have much of a choice, again since he had to be space conscious about it. The only other acoustic drum on 1984 besides the snare is the rototoms on “I’ll Wait”, and possibly “Jump”. Or maybe he was willing to experiment when Ed started to use synths.

    The synthetic sound of the drums makes it a dated record to me sometimes, however, 5150 is worse with that sound.

  20. rawkinrobbievh1

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    Can't believe it's been 30 years. 
  21. cowboydan

    11 months ago

    My brother Anthony bought the 1984 album for me for my 8th birthday. I had the first 3 VH 8 tracks and really loved the band…………..but hearing them on an album, with crystal clear sound and no cutting out in the middle of a song to switch to the next program…………….I was in heaven!!!! The music just jumped out of the speakers. It was unreal. And the cover is the best rock cover ever! Great, great album, even with Jump, lol.

    I’ll Wait was an instant favorite for me. As was Girl Gone Bad and Drop Dead Legs (that intro!). Top Jimmy was fun to try to sing along with. It was always hard to keep up with Dave and get all the words right,”Jimmy on the television…” Another great intro on that one too! I loved how heavy House of Pain was. Anytime any of my friends said VH was light I’d just play House of Pain, Mean Street and Atomic Punk. End of discussion. God, what a great album. Hot for Teacher is one of the coolest videos ever. I love, love, love Dave as a bus driver, and the burn out at the end of the video. Perfect!!

  22. rawkinrobbievh1

    11 months ago

    Great story , Dan .

    I’ve told mine before so I won’t bore ya , but the gist of it is this : 1984 was my first VH album . Got it when I was about 12 , on my way to South Africa for a 3 year stay . It marks a very cool yet scary time in my life . VH has been the soundtrack to my existence ever since !!!

  23. vhfanjack

    11 months ago

    My story isn’t as cool. I was six, and my Dad was browsing through Van Halen albums.. I looked through, looked at the cover of 1984, thought it was really cool, held it up to my Dad and told him to get that one. I didn’t go into in depth listening with it until I was 13.

  24. rawkinrobbievh1

    11 months ago

    I still think it’s cool !
    Who picks the cover of a Van Halen album when they’re 6 ? And what kid gets a new “toy” and then doesn’t play with it for 6 or 7 years ? None that I’ve ever heard of , that’s for sure .

    I guess it doesn’t matter how we all came across VH . The important thing is that we DID …

  25. cowboydan

    11 months ago

    Good stuff Jack. I love your avatar, too! :thumbs-up:

  26. vhfanjack

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    I still think it's cool !
    Who picks the cover of a Van Halen album when they're 6 ? And what kid gets a new "toy" and then doesn't play with it for 6 or 7 years ? None that I've ever heard of , that's for sure . 
    
    I guess it doesn't matter how we all came across VH . The important thing is that we DID ...

    He was looking for albums for himself, and I thought I’d intervene haha. My Dad was always a fun, and I’d always heard some snippets, but didn’t really start checking them out until I was 12. It was around the time my Dad was illegally downloading everything (he has a huge collection of cds, records and concert dvds, but for a bout a year he was downloading stuff instead), and he downloaded the Best of Both Worlds album. I heard some of that, and he always told me that the Dave years were the greatest. I’d heard a lot of the Sammy stuff up til then (yep..) from the Right Here, Right Now VHS tape, but not much Dave stuff.

    I got him to download the rest of the six pack, and was floored. I became obsessed. It was driving my family and my school nuts. I didn’t stop going on about Van Halen and Eddie. Around the time I was just getting into the six pack, I put in the DVD for Right Here, Right Now and was pretty much disgusted by the end and told myself that that definitely wasn’t Van Halen, haha.

    I really fell in love with the six pack on a road trip to Northern Australia. It was a two day drive, and I had pretty much nothing but those Van Halen albums on me. It changed my life..

  27. vhfanjack

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    Good stuff Jack. I love your avatar, too! :thumbs-up:

    Welcome back!

    I’m glad that someone noticed and can appreciate the greatness of Rage!

  28. rawkinrobbievh1

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    He was looking for albums for himself, and I thought I'd intervene haha. My Dad was always a fun, and I'd always heard some snippets, but didn't really start checking them out until I was 12. It was around the time my Dad was illegally downloading everything (he has a huge collection of cds, records and concert dvds, but for a bout a year he was downloading stuff instead), and he downloaded the Best of Both Worlds album. I heard some of that, and he always told me that the Dave years were the greatest. I'd heard a lot of the Sammy stuff up til then (yep..) from the Right Here, Right Now VHS tape, but not much Dave stuff.
    
    I got him to download the rest of the six pack, and was floored. I became obsessed. It was driving my family and my school nuts. I didn't stop going on about Van Halen and Eddie. Around the time I was just getting into the six pack, I put in the DVD for Right Here, Right Now and was pretty much disgusted by the end and told myself that that definitely wasn't Van Halen, haha.
    
    I really fell in love with the six pack on a road trip to Northern Australia. It was a two day drive, and I had pretty much nothing but those Van Halen albums on me. It changed my life..

    Fantastic !!!
    All of us VH fans aren’t always as different as our posts might make us seem . Just sayin’ …

    Thanks for the story .

  29. PrideofPasadena

    11 months ago

    The only VH record (and later on CD’s) that I didn’t buy myself.My girl at the time bought it for me not long after the release.What a sweetie.:colgate:

    I still remember hearing HFT on the radio for the first time.The first I had heard anything from it.We were hearing the drums going “who is this”? Is it VH maybe?
    As soon as the guitar kicked in….IT’S EDDIE!!!:101:
    “This tune freakin’ rules!!…I gotta get this record!!”:colgate:

  30. EVH_Erupted

    11 months ago

    Anyone kind of ever wonder what would have happened if they didn’t have “Jump” on that record? Just non-synth songs. I wonder if it would have been as big a seller. It seems the keys might have been a big reason. Eddie, the guitar wizard, playing synths, probably expanded the markets.

    Or maybe they were really at the top of their popularity and anything they would have put out would have been as successful.

  31. PrideofPasadena

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    Anyone kind of ever wonder what would have happened if they didn't have "Jump" on that record? Just non-synth songs. I wonder if it would have been as big a seller. It seems the keys might have been a big reason. Eddie, the guitar wizard, playing synths, probably expanded the markets.
    
    Or maybe they were really at the top of their popularity and anything they would have put out would have been as successful.

    Yeah,hard too imagine it being #2 without the keys.I still think it woulda been huge though.Panama and HFT are classics.MTV and the videos were just such a huge weapon in the marketing aspect.And the vids were just so good!

  32. unchainedguitars

    11 months ago

    It’s a great question.

    I remember my sister just loving, “Jump!”
    Previous to that, she never made mention of any VH song, that i know of.
    She knew i was an Eddie fanatic, but that was about it.

    But “Jump” brought in a new audience, or at least a bunch of people that bought
    the 45.
    She loved the video, too.

    “Panama” came after, and i just remember thinking, “That tune is excellent.”
    “Jump,” though, i was not impressed or eager to get the album.

  33. CalFB

    11 months ago

    We were at a beach side caravan park and there was one TV in the kids recreation room with Donkey Kong, Kiss Pinball etc… There used to be a music show on in the mornings called Sounds and the host said something like, “And when we come back from the break, the new song from Van Halen.” I remember saying to the other kids how awesome it was going to be. Having just returned from the UK where VH were quite well known, I had already become a huge fan. They weren’t very well known in Oz. Then the song came on, I was really disappointed, I didn’t like it, but the other kids did. I immediately bought the album when it hit and loved it, particularly Panama, HFT and Top jimmy. I really never liked I’ll Wait except for the solo until I saw them live last year, and it rocked live. Girl Gone Bad went on to become one of my all time favourite songs with Drop Dead Legs close behind. What started out as disappointing became yet another VH classic album and it was such a step up from Diver Down. Then I think my brain exploded when Dave left.

  34. vhfanjack

    11 months ago

    I never understood why “Jump” got all the credit for being the best music video by them.. I always found HFT and Panama to have much more entertaining videos.

  35. unchainedguitars

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    I never understood why "Jump" got all the credit for being the best music video by them.. I always found HFT and Panama to have much more entertaining videos.

    It really captured a sort of “this is us”, in the moment, vibe.

    It was kind of magical, because it was so low budget that it could have failed.
    But people loved the smiles, the up close camera work, the chemistry the band had in
    that video.

    I guess it was real, and people responded to it.

  36. rawkinrobbievh1

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    I never understood why "Jump" got all the credit for being the best music video by them.. I always found HFT and Panama to have much more entertaining videos.

    I think that the song and the video just reeked of FUN . It was a moment in time , that has stood the test of time . There was a lot of crossover appeal there . It had the same effect as Eddie playing on “Beat It” . There’s no denying that Michael Jackson was a talented performer , at least back then . Eddie’s cameo allowed him to reach a wider , huger , audience . That’s not a bad thing for a recording artist !!!

    We , the diehards , have always known that VH are a special band . 1994 and “Jump” allowed the world en masse to see that too .

  37. rawkinrobbievh1

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    Yeah,hard too imagine it being #2 without the keys.I still think it woulda been huge though.Panama and HFT are classics.MTV and the videos were just such a huge weapon in the marketing aspect.And the vids were just so good!

    The videos from the songs off of 1984 were EPIC !!!

  38. cowboydan

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    Anyone kind of ever wonder what would have happened if they didn't have "Jump" on that record? Just non-synth songs. I wonder if it would have been as big a seller. It seems the keys might have been a big reason. Eddie, the guitar wizard, playing synths, probably expanded the markets.
    
    Or maybe they were really at the top of their popularity and anything they would have put out would have been as successful.

    While listening to Little Guitars today, it occurred to me that this song is a keyboard song played on guitar. Let me rephrase that….Eddie plays the guitar as if it were a keyboard….very percussive. I thought of this question that you posed, and it made me wonder if, instead of not including Jump on the record, what if he played it like he played Little Guitars? What if he played all the keyboard parts with that percussive guitar style instead? Would it sound awesome? Would it still be the mega-hit that it was? Have I just had too much coffee this morning? ;)

  39. unchainedguitars

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    While listening to Little Guitars today, it occurred to me that this song is a keyboard song played on guitar. Let me rephrase that....Eddie plays the guitar as if it were a keyboard....very percussive. I thought of this question that you posed, and it made me wonder if, instead of not including Jump on the record, what if he played it like he played Little Guitars? What if he played all the keyboard parts with that percussive guitar style instead? Would it sound awesome? Would it still be the mega-hit that it was? Have I just had too much coffee this morning? ;)

    If you listen to “Jump.” he’s using the same chords/inversions, he uses in his guitar playing (Panama, Dance the night away, etc.)
    In a way, his keyboard stuff is kind of wimpier versions of the guitar orientated material.

    Still have a hard time believing HAIL was originally written on keyboard or piano.
    It’s such a guitar/riff heavy, song.

  40. PrideofPasadena

    11 months ago

    Interesting question.
    Without the keys I don’t see Jump being a hit.With the keys it appeals to non VH fans,without them they wouldn’t of jumped on the wagon.I do think with strictly guitars it still would’ve been good.I’d like to hear that version.Too bad they didn’t do one.I probably would’ve liked it more.They could do one now.:colgate:

  41. 1234over

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    If you listen to "Jump." he's using the same chords/inversions, he uses in his guitar playing (Panama, Dance the night away, etc.)
    In a way, his keyboard stuff is kind of wimpier versions of the guitar orientated material.
    
    Still have a hard time believing HAIL was originally written on keyboard or piano.
    It's such a guitar/riff heavy, song.

    I can believe it, he probably just meant the intro. I think he started it on keys, but worked it up a bit when he played it on guitar.

    The hesitations when he make chord changes, and plays low notes that are “answered” with high phrases, sound just like a piano player changing his left hand position on the keyboard.

  42. rawkinrobbievh1

    11 months ago

    QUOTE

    Interesting question.
    Without the keys I don't see Jump being a hit.With the keys it appeals to non VH fans,without them they wouldn't of jumped on the wagon.I do think with strictly guitars it still would've been good.I'd like to hear that version.Too bad they didn't do one.I probably would've liked it more.They could do one now.:colgate:

    I agree . Part of the reason “Jump” had mass appeal was because of the keyboards IMO .
    They just have a different timbre to them , and they served the song very well . I’d be interested to hear a guitar version as well , to compare the qualities of both .

  43. Boy Howdy

    11 months ago

    Testing. Testing.