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Did Huge Asteroid Take Out the Dinosaurs??
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  1. #1
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    Did Huge Asteroid Take Out the Dinosaurs??

    http://science.nbcnews.com/_news/201...eath-blow?lite

    Or was it a drone strike from Obama?? I kid, I kid. Pretty interesting article below, Click on the link to see interesting pics:



    New proof that asteroid impact dealt the dinosaurs a quick death blow

    February 8, 2013, 10:26 am


    NBCNews.com


    Don Davis An artist's impression of a 6-mile-wide asteroid striking the Earth. Scientists now have fresh evidence that such a cosmic impact ended the age of dinosaurs near what is now the town of Chixculub in Mexico.

    By Charles Choi
    LiveScience

    The idea that a cosmic impact ended the age of dinosaurs in what is now Mexico now has fresh new support, researchers say.

    The most recent and most familiar mass extinction is the one that finished the reign of the dinosaurs — the end-Cretaceous or Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event, often known as K-T. The only survivors among the dinosaurs are the birds.

    Currently, the main suspect behind this catastrophe is a cosmic impact from an asteroid or comet, an idea first proposed by physicist Luis Alvarez and his son, geologist Walter Alvarez. Scientists later found that signs of this collision seemed evident near the town of Chicxulub (CHEEK-sheh-loob) in Mexico in the form of a gargantuan crater more than 110 miles (180 kilometers) wide. The explosion, likely caused by an object about 6 miles (10 kilometers) across, would have released as much energy as 100 trillion tons of TNT, more than a billion times more than the atom bombs that destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    However, further work suggested the Chicxulub impact occurred either 300,000 years before or 180,000 years after the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. As such, researchers have explored other possibilities, including other impact sites, such as the controversial Shiva crater in India, or even massive volcanic eruptions, such as those creating the Deccan Flats in India.



    Courtesy of Paul Renne Doctoral student Bill Mitchell collects a volcanic ash sample from a coal bed just above the final dinosaur extinction level.

    Timing of an impact
    New findings using high-precision radiometric dating analysis of debris kicked up by the impact now suggest the K-T event and the Chicxulub collision happened no more than 33,000 years apart. In radiometric dating, scientists estimate the ages of samples based on the relative proportions of specific radioactive materials within them. [Wipe Out: History's Most Mysterious Mass Extinctions]

    "We've shown the impact and the mass extinction coincided as much as one can possibly demonstrate with existing dating techniques," researcher Paul Renne, a geochronologist and director of the Berkeley Geochronology Center in California, told LiveScience.



    Courtesy of Klaudia Kuiper Near Jordan, Mont., rock layers expose the level (lower arrow) where dinosaurs and many other animals and plants went extinct. The arrows point to coal beds that contain thin volcanic ash layers that were dated.

    "It's gratifying to see these results, for those of us who've been arguing a long time that there was an impact at the time of this mass extinction," geologist Walter Alvarez at the University of California at Berkeley, who did not participate in this study, told LiveScience. "This research is just a tour de force, a demonstration of really skillful geochronology to resolve time that well."

    The fact the impact and mass extinction may have been virtually simultaneous in time supports the idea that the cosmic impact dealt the age of dinosaurs its deathblow.

    "The impact was clearly the final straw that pushed Earth past the tipping point," Renne said. "We have shown that these events are synchronous to within a gnat's eyebrow, and therefore, the impact clearly played a major role in extinctions, but it probably wasn't just the impact."

    The new extinction date is precise to within 11,000 years.

    "When I got started in the field, the error bars on these events were plus or minus a million years," added paleontologist William Clemens at the University of California at Berkeley, who did not participate in this research. "It's an exciting time right now, a lot of which we can attribute to the work that Paul and his colleagues are doing in refining the precision of the time scale with which we work."

    Cosmic Log: Asteroid closes in for close encounter — and a swift kick

    Although the cosmic impact and mass extinction coincided in time, Renne cautioned this does not mean the impact was the only cause of the die-offs. For instance, dramatic climate swings in the preceding million years, including long cold snaps in the general hothouse environment of the Cretaceous, probably brought many creatures to the brink of extinction. The volcanic eruptions behind the Deccan Traps might be one cause of these climate variations.

    "These precursory phenomena made the global ecosystem much more sensitive to even relatively small triggers, so that what otherwise might have been a fairly minor effect shifted the ecosystem into a new state," Renne said.

    The cosmic impact then proved the death blow.

    "What we really need to do is to understand better what was going on before the impact — what was the level of ecological stress that existed that allowed the impact to be the straw that broke the camel's back?" Renne said. "We also need better dates for the massive volcanism at the Deccan Flats to better understand when it first started and how fast it occurred."

    The scientists will detail their findings in Friday's issue of the journal Science.
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  2. #2
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    It seems so bizarre that the earth was once inhabited by these giant reptiles.
    I'm not sure how God even fits into the equation.

    Why did they exist, in the first place?

    After they were destroyed, why did other species develop, instead?

    How come we never had another devestating Asteroid wipe us out?

    In the early years of space travel, did scientists consider more dinosaurs might be dwelling
    on Venus or Mars?

    Are there still dinosaurs roaming, somewhere, in another solar system?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by unchainedguitars View Post
    It seems so bizarre that the earth was once inhabited by these giant reptiles.
    I'm not sure how God even fits into the equation.

    Why did they exist, in the first place?

    After they were destroyed, why did other species develop, instead?

    How come we never had another devestating Asteroid wipe us out?

    In the early years of space travel, did scientists consider more dinosaurs might be dwelling
    on Venus or Mars?

    Are there still dinosaurs roaming, somewhere, in another solar system?
    That's what I always found puzzling.. They had these gigantic reptiles living for 250 million years, and then after that, they don't come back.

    Why then? Why not now?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by unchainedguitars View Post
    It seems so bizarre that the earth was once inhabited by these giant reptiles.
    I'm not sure how God even fits into the equation.

    Why did they exist, in the first place?

    After they were destroyed, why did other species develop, instead?

    How come we never had another devestating Asteroid wipe us out?

    In the early years of space travel, did scientists consider more dinosaurs might be dwelling
    on Venus or Mars?

    Are there still dinosaurs roaming, somewhere, in another solar system?
    Asking why something exists is a difficult thing to answer, because no one knows why anything exists. Although, scientists can give you an idea on how. I'm not exactly an expert, but I read a lot and we actually studied this situation in Geology class. Most likely, the dinosaurs evolved from pre-existing life.

    The meteor impact would have drastically changed the temperature of the planet, the impact was that big, so it would have altered the environment they lived in. They most likely couldn't have survived in the newly created weather system, as the cold was probably something they weren't used to, and the sources of food would have died off rather quick which would leave to starvation. Mammals are significantly smaller creatures and are more capable of adaptation of shitty weather than the reptile-like dinosaurs. I'm not so sure about oceanic life, however.

    The universe is a vast, expansive place with endless possibilities. We're not even a speck. Scientists have found other habitable planets on the far side of the galaxy, I'm sure there's a chance of a dinosaur or two.
    Ready, Eddie!

  5. #5
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    But just the fact they existed, in the first place, seems so strange.
    These giant lizard monsters!

    You go from that, to an adorable little kitten being born.
    There's no rhyme or reason, it seems.

    I guess, using Erupted's logic, you could say smaller Dinosaurs exist (like Iguana's, chameleons, Barney, etc.)
    The smaller one's could adapt better, then the prehistoric one's.

    I heard that sharks have existed, in some form, as long as the dinosaurs.
    They say Sharks are the super-breed, evolved over time, into these killing machine creatures.

  6. #6
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    Sharks have been around for 400 million years. They've been around for longer than the Dinosaurs. Somehow, they have managed, with their general structure barely changing. It's just that perfect.

  7. #7
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    When I was in DC for the Cowboys game at the end of December I spent some time on the National Mall, and one of the coolest things was going in to the Natural History Museum and standing next to the fully constructed dinosaur skeletons. It was chilling, and amazing, to walk past them and really see how large they were. It was the first time in my life that they actually felt real to me. All these years of reading about them and seeing them in movies, but that experience really made it hit home. That made them real in an instant.




    Imagine how different our lives would be if they were still here. Imagine how different cities and highways and airports and houses and backyards would be constructed. Imagine how much they would influence everything about world.
    Last edited by cowboydan; February 8th, 2013 at 06:49 PM.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboydan View Post
    When I was in DC for the Cowboys game at the end of December I spent some time on the National Mall, and one of the coolest things was going in to the Natural History Museum and standing next to the fully constructed dinosaur skeletons. It was chilling, and amazing, to walk past them and really see how large they were. It was the first time in my life that they actually felt real to me. All these years of reading about them and seeing them in movies, but that experience really made it hit home. That made them real in an instant.




    Imagine how different our lives would be if they were still here. Imagine how different cities and highways and airports and houses and backyards would be constructed. Imagine how much they would influence everything about world.
    Awesome picture, Dan.

    Haha, if they were still around, we'd all be driving tanks and backyard fences would be much taller than 6 feet...
    "My favorite position for drumming was always a cigarette in one hand and a drink in the other. And checking out the women!"-Alex Van Halen

    Proud to be an ADKOT loving, Drum Thread starting CVH "bad apple" to counterpoint pompous, self centered egotism.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jungle Drummer View Post
    Awesome picture, Dan.

    Haha, if they were still around, we'd all be driving tanks and backyard fences would be much taller than 6 feet...
    Cue the theme song from Land of The Lost! (one of my favorite shows when I was a kid, btw)

    "I won't go down in history, but I will go down on your sister."
    -David Lee Roth-



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboydan View Post
    Cue the theme song from Land of The Lost! (one of my favorite shows when I was a kid, btw)

    Yes! I loved that show, too! Sid and Marty Krofft had amazing shows back in the 70s.
    "My favorite position for drumming was always a cigarette in one hand and a drink in the other. And checking out the women!"-Alex Van Halen

    Proud to be an ADKOT loving, Drum Thread starting CVH "bad apple" to counterpoint pompous, self centered egotism.

    Duct Tape:A Drummer's best friend!

 

 

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